Most Christians to Give Up Social Media for Lent

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A recent poll conducted by DecisionData.org reveals that many American Christians are giving up social media for Lent this year.

The website asked 586 American adults on an indulgence they are denying themselves for the 40-day season ending in Easter Sunday. It found that 21% of the respondents chose to fast on “social media” this Lent.

Religious or not, Lent can be a great time of year to give up a distraction and refocus on other things that might be more important in our lives. —DecisionData.org

“Social media” is followed by “Alcohol” (18%), “Chocolate/sweets” (13%), and “Soda/coffee” (11%). The other things American Christians are giving up include “Junk snacks,” “Fast food,” “Pornography,” “Marijuana,” and “Tobacco.” Seven percent of American Christians chose “Other” in the list, like television, music, and news.

DecisionData.org conducts this type of poll every other year. For many years, Americans gave up alcohol and television for Lent, but not this year.

The website speculates that “Social media” topped this year’s list because of a “growing disdain toward social media.” Also, with the proliferation of fake news and the negative press about social media corporations, Americans are deciding to log off temporarily from these platforms.

During Lent, many people decide on what they want to give up in order to replicate Jesus’s suffering as He journeyed into the desert for 40 days. But, DecisionData.org said, “Religious or not, Lent can be a great time of year to give up a distraction and refocus on other things that might be more important in our lives.”

For those doing the ‘digital detox’ this Lent, UK news website The Sun gave a few tips on how to be successful in this challenge.

  1. Uninstall social media apps. The icon on your phone’s screen is a great temptation to visit your social media accounts. You’re less likely to log on if there’s no icon to tap.
  2. Notify family members, friends, colleagues. Inform people in your social circle that you’re going “off-grid” to avoid misunderstandings when you don’t reply to their messages, or you don’t greet them on during special occasions.
  3. Write down important events. List family birthdays, anniversaries, meetings, etc. so you’ll not rely on Facebook notifications.
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